Natural Asset Management - ONLINE

Overview

Topics

Facilitator

  OFFERED: feb 1 - Feb 28, 2021

 

Overview

Canadian communities face challenges of declining infrastructure quality and diminishing health and resilience of many ecosystems, a challenge made far more pressing by climate change. To address this, leading local governments are starting to identify, value and account for natural assets in their financial planning and asset management programs as a means to develop deliver core services sustainably through a climate resilient green infrastructure. This four-week online course covers core concepts, the most recent case examples and latest approaches to municipal natural asset management, and is delivered by the Executive Director of the Municipal Natural Assets Initiative. It will provide both essential information to anyone working for, or with local governments or who is interested in innovative approaches to community sustainability; and, an opportunity to discuss with peers and the instructor, potential approaches to challenges and opportunities in students’ own communities.

Topics

Module 1 – Introduction to the course, municipal natural asset management & each other

In this Module, we will become familiar with the core concepts of natural asset management – what it is, how it is defined, what it is based on, and how it came to be. We will also take time to understand each others’ interests in natural asset management so that collectively, we can help advance our various journeys in this fast-evolving field.

Module 2 – Natural asset management on the ground

The focus of this module is on the communities that have been leading the way on natural asset management.  We will learn about how the original work in Gibsons, BC has spread to communities in 4 provinces; what the results have been so far, and why.
 

Module 3 – The enabling environment for natural asset management

Local governments do not operate in a vacuum and there are many factors that affect their ability to undertake natural asset management.  The regulatory environment, financial frameworks, and multi-jurisdictional nature of land ownership mean that multiple actors will influence local government’s ability to manage natural assets for municipal service delivery.  This ‘enabling environment’ becomes a critical consideration if the ultimate goal is to have Canada’s nearly 4000 local governments all undertaking natural asset management, not just a handful of leaders.  In this module we will discuss this context, with particular focus on opportunities and barriers to accelerating the uptake of natural asset management.

Module 4 – So what?

In this module we will dig into your individual and group contexts to answer the question – “what could I being doing differently tomorrow than I am doing today, on natural asset management?”

Facilitator

Roy Brooke is the Executive Director of the Municipal Natural Assets Initiative (MNAI). He served as Director of Sustainability for the City of Victoria between 2011-2013. Between 2003-2011 he worked for the World Health Organization, United Nations Environment Programme and UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, based in Geneva, Switzerland, and later in Rwanda, where he was UNEP’s Environment Programme Coordinator. Prior to this Roy served as a political advisor to Canada’s Environment Minister.

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